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Ranch rodeo continues long-standing tradition

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  • Ranch rodeo continues long-standing tradition
    Ranch rodeo continues long-standing tradition

This Saturday’s Women’s Spring Ranch Rodeo and Kids Mutton Bustin’ is more than a tourist event or celebration of cowboy culture. It carries on a century-old tradition.

Ranch Rodeos in Bandera County have at least a 35 year history, as The Frontier Times Museum organized ranch rodeos in the area in the mid 80s. These ranch rodeos involved actual local ranch owners who took on the task of rounding up family members and/or local cowboys to compete in such ranch rodeos.

In 1985 (or -86) Speedy Hicks, the patriarch of the Hicks family and owner of the Hix (a/k/a Hicks) Ranch, rode his horse into the trailer during the Trailer Loading event. Speedy, with roped steer in tow, created a memorable event as the trailer had a roof, and he had to bend backwards and sideways over his horse to keep from hitting the roof.

Over the past 35 years, the popularity of ranch rodeos has spread across Bandera County. This Saturday, March 5, Bandera Pro Rodeo will host the Women’s Spring Ranch Rodeo and Kids Mutton Bustin’ at Mansfield Park.

Gates for the event open at 6 p.m., and the rodeo begins at 7 p.m.

Admission is $10 for ages 13 and up, free for ages 12 and under.

Mutton Bustin’ fee is $20 and begins at 6 p.m.

Mansfield Park is located at 2886 Highway 16 N just outside Bandera’s city limits.

For more information, contact Janna at 830-460-1071 or jannalindig@sbcglobal.net.